The Detailed Creation Account of Lilith in Ge 2:4-7

The most important passages to tackle in arguing Lilith’s existence in Genesis are those concerning the second
creation account of Adam in Ge 2:4-7 .  As we have seen, a cursory reading of those passages suggests that
Adam was created alone in a rather uneventful sequence of actions.  However, quite the opposite is true.  The
passages are trying to relate momentous events.  They are announcing the simultaneous beginnings of two
rival generations of humans.  One generation is rooted in “the man” (i.e. Adam).  The other is rooted in ”the
woman” (i.e. Lilith).  The man’s generation would be deemed that of the earth, for the beginnings of his
generation were complete upon the earth with his creation.  The man’s generations were after the likeness of
God, for he was animated by the holy breath of God with filled his nostrils.  The woman’s generation would be
deemed that of the heavens, for the beginnings of her generation were rooted in angels which descended from
heaven to mate with her.  The woman’s generations were in the likeness of Lucifer, for she was animated by his
spirit which erupted up from the earth in a mist and watered her face.  

The passages of Ge 2:4-7 are a bit difficult to fully comprehend because of the Hebrew construct employed to
arrange the verses and because of some of their symbolic imagery.  Verse 4 opens the account with a very odd
pronouncement.  It states that, “These are the generations of the heavens and the earth in their creation.”  To
state that the heavens and the earth have “generations” is very unusual.  The Hebrew word used for
generations is
towledot.  It might be best translated as “begettings” or “those begotten”.   In the Bible Towledot
always refers to the begetted children (i.e. generations) of a person.  In all its usages, the fathering entity doing
the begetting immediately follows after the word.  In Ge 2:4 “the heavens” and “the earth” are listed
immediately after
towledot.  Thus the verse speaks of the begettings of two generations, whose fathering
entities are “the heavens” and “the earth”.  Obviously, the heavens and the earth are non-living entities
incapable of fathering life.  The terms refer to the places where the fathering spirits reside.  Note that the
opening verse is very clear that the following passages will concern the two generations “in their creation”.  
Thus it announces that the following passages will discuss the origins or genesis of the two generations.  

Unfortunately, to most laypersons the next verses appear to be a mishmash of odd statements.  A proper
understanding always begins with a good literal interpretation of the Hebrew.  My best literal translation of the
passages is below.  The word-by-word break down is given in Table 9.2 1.  

In the translation below I attempt to maintain an important distinction made in the literal Hebrew.  I am very
careful to distinguish between the proper name Adam and the term
ha’adam, which is literally “the adam” and is
commonly translated as “the man” in English.  I do this because the Bible uses each term for distinct purposes.  
The name Adam refers to dual male and female creature, whereas the term
ha’adam (the man) refers solely to
the masculine side of Adam.  This is based on Ge 5:2, which states when God created the male and female,
together he called their name “Adam”.  Thus “Adam” was a name for a dual creature consisting of both a male
and female.  When Genesis wants to specifically address the male half of Adam, it uses the term
ha’adam (“the
man”).  This is demonstrated in that the first 22 times Genesis refers to the created male, it uses the term
ha’adam (the man).  With the physical creation of the male, the name “Adam” disappears from Genesis until
late in Genesis 4.  The mystery of this is discussed later.  For now lets focus on the fact that if a woman were
created from the earth at the same time as
ha’adam (the man), then we would expect Genesis to refer to her as
ha’adamah (the woman).  This is because ha’adamah is the feminine form of ha’adam.  Thus any Genesis
reference to
ha’adamah in the creation account should be considered a candidate reference to Lilith, the
female half of the Adam duo.  For that reason I leave the appearances of
ha’adamah in verses 5, 6, and 7
below partially untranslated as “the adamah”.  The KJV translates
ha’adamah as “the ground” in these three
cases, as
adamah (hmda - Strongs 127) means ‘ground’ in the Hebrew.  As we shall see, an analysis of the
passages strongly indicate that the verse 6 appearance must be understood as “the woman”.  I also hold that
the other two appearances should be understood as “the woman”.  

Ge 2:4-7 (My Literal)
    4  These are the begettings of the heavens and of the earth in their creation; In the day that Jehovah God had made earth
    and heavens.  
    5  And all bushes of the field are before they came to be in the earth and all herbs of the field are before they sprouted,
    because Jehovah God not has caused it to rain upon the earth, and Adam is not for serving the adamah.
    6  And there rose up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the adamah.
    7  And Jehovah God formed the man of dust from the adamah, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the
    man became a living soul.
The key to understanding the verses is realizing they are constructed with a series of sentence doublets in the
Hebrew.  A series of sentence doublets consist of two parallel yet separate accounts interweaved in a single set
of passages.  For example, a Hebrew sentence may start off by stating two facts 1A and 1B.  The second
sentence states that 2A and 2B happen.  The third sentence states the reasons are 3A and 3B.  A final sentence
states 4A and 4B occur.  The doublet construct is based on the fact that 1A maps to 2A maps to 3A maps to 4A.  
These mapped elements forms a string of statements, termed String A, concerning a common topic.  Likewise, 1B
maps to 2B maps to 3B maps to 4B.  This forms a second string of statements, termed String B, concerning a
mirror topic to String A.  The objective of the doublet construct is contrast and compare String A to String B.  The
construct neatly matches every element in String A to its counterpart in String B, thereby facilitating the contrast
and compare of each element and the overall message of both strings.  The doublet is a useful and compact tool
for contrasting and comparing similar events.  

Let us first discuss the String B doublets in verses 4 through 6, which are easiest to follow.  This is laid out in the
last column of Table 9.2.1 2.  1B declares that this string concerns the creation of the begettings (or generations)
of the earth.  2B states that these begettings were established in the day Jehovah had made the heavens.  3B
declares the current time is a time before all herbs (i.e. cultivated crops
**) of the field have sprouted.  4B explains
that this lack of crops is because Adam does not yet exist to till or serve the ground, and 5B relates that God
formed
ha’adam (the man) from the dust of the adamah, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the
man became a living soul.  These parts are all linked and discuss the same topic.  When put together they relate
that after the heavens were created, the herbs of the field had not yet sprouted because there was no Adam to
cultivate them (serve the
adamah).  After God created the man from the dust of the adamah, there was a man to
till them, and the cultivated herbs of the field did sprout, and generations of the earth were complete.  Thus the
herbs of the field are the generations of the earth, and their beginnings are in
ha’adam (the man).  Note the last
three elements of the doublet are written in reverse chronological order.  3B says there are currently no crops in
field, 4B explains this is because there is no Adam.  5B documents the creation of
ha’adam (the man) and the
beginning of the generation of the heavens.  

    **The Hebrew used for “herbs of the field” is eseb ha’sadeh (hdv:h bve, Strongs 6212 and 7704).  In its four other usages in
    the Bible, the term eseb ha’sadeh always refers to cultivated crops (Ge 3:18, Ex 9:22, 25, 10:15).  Thus before Adam was
    created, there was no man to plant and tend these cultivated crops.

Now let us consider the String A doublets, which is laid out in Table 9.2.1-2.  1A declares that this string concerns
the creation of the begettings (or generations) of the heavens.  2A states that these begettings were established
in the day Jehovah had made the earth.  3A states that the current time is a time before the bushes (i.e.
wasteland plants) of the field have come to exist in the earth.  4A explains that this is because Jehovah had not
yet caused it to rain upon the earth, and 5A relates that a mist rose and watered the face of ha’adamah (“the
ground” or “the woman”).  These parts are again all linked and discuss the same topic.  When put together they
relate that after the earth was first formed, there existed no bushes in the field because Jehovah had not caused
a rain upon the earth.  Using this string’s parallelism with the String B doublets concerning Adam to guide us, we
see that Jehovah had not caused it to rain because the mist had not yet erupted from the earth and watered the
face of
ha’adamah.  Once this mist erupted, Jehovah caused a rain upon the earth, the bushes of the field began
to exist in the earth, and the generations of the heavens were complete.  The bushes of the field are the
generations of the heavens, and their beginnings, which is the entire point of the passages as announced at the
start of verse 4, occurs when the mist waters the face of
ha’adamah.  By parallelism with the String B doublets
concerning
ha’adam (the man), this watering of the ha’adamah (the ground) should result in a living creature
responsible for the bushes of the field.  Thus the A/B parallelism of the doublet construct is best fit by
understanding
ha’adamah of 5A as referring to “the woman” half of the Adam duo.  Through the parallelism we
also see that the mist of the earth and the breath of God are the two inseminating forces in the rival generations.  
The target of the mist was the face of
ha’adamah (the woman).  The target of God’s breath was the nostrils of
ha’adam (the man).  

The notion that the ascending mist was a rival inseminating agent to Jehovah’s holy spirit is confirmed from the
Hebrew verb used to denote that the mist ascended.  Verse 6 states a mist
ya’alah (arose) from the earth and
watered the face of
ha’adamah (the woman).  Ya’alah means ‘to ascend’ under one’s own power..   This makes it
clear that the mist arose from the earth of its own accord and power, and was not a direct causation of Jehovah  
Also note that God purposely created
ha’adam (the man) with dry dust free of the mist’s defilement.
The key to understanding the message of the String A doublet is to understand the mystical symbolism of the key
items mentioned.  The bushes of the field are cursed plants in a dry desolate waste that was once flooded.  The
rain caused by Jehovah is not a raining of water, but rather a raining of curses down upon the earth.  
The Hebrew used for “bushes“ is
siyach (xyv, Strongs 7880).  Siyach plants are mentioned three times elsewhere
in the Bible (Ge 21:15, Job 30:4, 7).  In every case they are bushes in desert waste lands.  In the two cases in Job
they are bushes in a desert waste formerly flooded by a cursing deluge (see 7.1.2.3.1.1).  
Siyach literally means
‘to speak’ or ‘to complain’.  This may have come to name the plants because of their stressed appearance or
bitter taste.  
Siyach probably refers to thorn bushes or some similar harsh plant associated with desolated
deserts.  

Verse 5 states that the bushes of field did not exist because God had not yet “caused it to rain”.  The verb for
“caused to rain” is
hamatayr (ryjmh).  It is the Hiphal (or causative Qal) form of matar (rjm - Strongs 4305),
which means ‘to rain’ or ‘to pelt down’.  Much like the English verb rain, the Hebrew
matar can refer to the raining
of water or the raining or pelting down of any item.  Surprisingly, the connotation of
matar within the Bible is not
positive.  
Matar is used 13 other times in the Bible, and all but three of these cases it refers to God’s “raining
down” of curses upon the earth.  The mystical meaning of
hamatayr used in the passage denotes God’s raining
down of bitter water curses.  This stems from the PFA for the word.  The PFA is defined by the only other exact
spelling of
hamatayr elsewhere in the Bible.  This comes in Ge 19:24, where God hamatayr (“caused to rain
down”) fire and brimstone upon Sodom and Gomorrah.  Thus we can see that verse 5 is relating that the cursed
siyach ha’sadeh were the result of curses rained down by God from heaven.  These curses were in turn the result
of the mist which erupted from the earth and watered the face of the
adamah.  

The most astounding mystical symbolism in text is concerns the mist watering
ha’adam, which we hold is Lilith’s
body.  The word for “watered” in verse 6 is
v’hashaqah (sp hqvh:w).    Nu 5:24 and 27 are the only two passages
elsewhere in the Tanach where
v’hashaqah can be found spelled exactly as in verse 6.  Those two passages
concerns the bitter water trial of the adulterous wife.  In both instances
v’hashaqah refers to the priest causing the
woman “to drink” of the cursed bitter waters.  Thus the PFA for
v’hashaqah  denotes the drinking of bitter waters
that the wayward adulterous wife of the Sotah trial.  This implies that in her creation account in Ge 2, Lilith is
mystically said to be drinking the waters of the Sotah.  

There is another fascinating step to which to take this analysis.  The passages are discussing the generations of
the woman and the man.  It is clear from the passages that the bushes of the field and the herbs of the field are
emblematic of their generations.  As such, the bushes of the field and the herbs of the field represent the seed of
these heads.  This means that the bushes of the field represent Lilith’s seed, whom we shall see are the
descendents of her son Azazel among the
Nephilim.  Is there any textual evidence to reinforce this interpretation?  
Yes there is.  First consider the literal meaning of the “bushes in the field”, the
siyach ha’sadeh.  As already
mentioned, the literal meaning of
siyach is ‘to speak’ or ‘to complain’.  Thus verse 5 could be literally translated to
say that after God had rained down curses upon the earth, “speakings” or “complaints” of the field came to exist
in the earth.  The notion of speaking and complaining voices coming from the field reminds us of the voice of the
slain Abel, who blood in the ground cried up to God.  This suggests speaking voices of the field could be the
cryings of the spirits of Lilith’s slain
Nephilim seed.  This notion is further supported by the PFA for siyach.  The
first exact spellings of
siyach elsewhere in the Tanach comes in 1Ki 18:27.  There Elijah mocks the priests of Baal,
claiming that their god could not respond to his challenge because Baal was busy
siyach (talking or complaining).  
Thus
siyach is associated with the speech of demons.  Thus, verse 5 could be literally understood to say that after
the rain of God, the speaking or complaints of demons appeared in the earth.  The disembodied spirits of the
Nephilim are demons, who exist in the earth even after the flood.  

If the complaining voices in the field are the slain
Nephilim seed of Lilith (i.e. those descended from Azazel), then
the raining down of God’s curses upon the earth could be in reference to rains of Noah flood, which we have seen
mirror a bitter water curse.  Is there any textual evidence to support this?  Yes there is.  Verse 5 states that the
bushes of field did not exist because God had not yet
hamatayr “caused to rain”.  The raining event which brings
about the bushes goes unspecified in the immediate passages.  The next mention of any kind of
matar rain in the
Bible comes in Ge 7:4, where God declares he will caused a
matayr (rain) upon the earth for 40 days and 40
nights to bring about Noah’s flood.  Could this finally be the rain mentioned in verse 5?  It certainly seems the
case when all evidences are considered.  There is a further eerie similarity linking Lilith’s creation to elements of
Noah’s flood.  In Noah’s flood the fountains of the deep broke through the earth and contributed to the flood.  In
Lilith’s creation story we have a similar phenomena, the mist which erupted from the earth and watered her body.  
Why are the opening phrases of the doublets reversed?  String B says, “These are the begetings of the earth ...
in the day God made the heavens.”  String A says, “these are the begettings of the heavens ... in the day God
made the earth.”  The explanation for String B is that the begettings of the earth (Adam) were planned and
established by God when he created the heavens (i.e. at the beginning of time).  The explanation for String A is
that the begettings of the heavens (fallen angels mating with Lilith and daughters of man) were not planned and
established until God created the earth.  Only then could the angels see the daughters of man upon the earth and
be tempted by the evil Lilith to plan or purpose their illicit unions with them.  These notions are confirmed by
details in the passages.  Verse 5 states that before God’s raining down of curses, there were no
siyach in the
earth.  This is contrast to the
eseb herbs of Adam’s generations, which were present in earth but had not yet
sprouted.  That the
siyach priorly did not exist in earth implies that the siyach were fathered from something
outside the earth.  This is the fathering spirits of the Watchers, the angels who descended to earth to mate with
the daughters of man and Lilith.  Adam’s
eseb herbs were said to already be present in earth because the
complete genealogy of Adam’s generations were present on the earth at his creation from the dust.  

There is one more remarkable point to note.  When one becomes equipped with the full understanding of what the
passages are conveying, then in looking back at the sentence doublets, we can they that they reveal the entire
history of the generations they discuss.  To ease the reading of this history, lets reverse the order of the 3rd
through 5th doublets as they constructed in reverse chronological order.  This is done in Table 9.2.1 3.  Text in
brackets ( [ ] ) in the table and its corresponding reconstructions below are added information.  This information is
based on mystical meanings of the words used, and a general knowledge of events that can be obtained from
sources outside the passages.  Note in part four of the doublets, I interpret the passages as saying that Adam
(the man and Eve) would serve the curses of the woman Lilith.  This notion is supported by Ge 2.23, which states
that after God cursed the man Adam, he ejected the man from the garden “to serve
ha’adamah from which he
was taken”.  The
ha’adamah from which the man Adam was taken is the dry dust not spoiled by the mist of the
verse 6.  The readings of the table are provided below.  

This is the String B story of the generations of the earth.  
    These are the begettings of the earth in its creation in the day that Jehovah God made the heavens.  
    Jehovah God formed the man from the dust of the woman (i.e. that part of her body not defiled by the mist),
    and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life.  [But the man fell,] and Adam (the man and Eve) were
    cursed to serve the [curses of the defiled] woman.  [But Adam (the man his wife Eve) was redeemed starting
    with the birth of Seth], and all the herbs of the field sprouted (i.e. God’s intended generations of the original
    Adam finally came to be).   

This is the String A story of the generations of the heavens.  
    These are the begettings of the heavens in its creation in the day that Jehovah God made the earth.  And
    there rose up a mist from the earth and watered the entire face of the woman.  [And she became defiled
    and went astray and bore seed to the Watchers.]  And Jehovah God rained down upon the earth [the
    curses of the Noah’s flood.  And woman’s seed was slain and cast down in chains into the earth,] and all the
    complaining [disembodied] voices of the field came to be in the earth.  
In summary, the Lilith legend alone is consistent with the elaborate doublet construct of the passages comprising
Ge 2:4-6.  Only her rival generation to Adam’s explains the rival generations of the heavens and the earth.  Only
her body’s animation by the mist which erupted from the earth can complete the mirror counterpart to Adam’s
animation from Jehovah’s spirit that the doublet construction demands.  I hold that this analysis of these passages
is a slam dunk for the case for Lilith.  Further evidence is hardly necessary.  But there is so much more.
Back to Lilith in the Bible
Back to Lilith in the Bible